Indiana Virtual School [Home]

Course Progression

Middle School

Middle School Track

High School

  • Michigan Merit Curriculum (download PDF)

    Michigan High School Graduation Requirements (18 credits)

    • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA) – 4 Credits – Proficiency in State Content Standards for ELA (4 credits)

    • MATHEMATICS – 4 Credits – Proficiency in State Content Standards for Mathematics (3 credits); and – Proficiency in district approved 4th Mathematics credit options (1 credit) (Student MUST have a Math experience in their final year of high school.)

    • ONLINE LEARNING EXPERIENCE – Course, Learning, or Integrated Learning Experience.

    • PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH – 1 Credit – Proficiency in State Content Standards for Physical Education and Health (1 credit); or – Proficiency with State Content Standards for Health (1/2 credit) and district approved extra- curricular activities involving physical activities (1/2 credit).

    • SCIENCE – 3 Credits – Proficiency in State Content Standards for Science (3 credits); or – Proficiency in some State Content Standards for Science (2 credits) and completion of a Department approved formal Career and Technical Education (CTE) program (1 credit).

    • SOCIAL STUDIES – 3 Credits – Proficiency in State Content Standards for Social Studies (3 credits).

    • VISUAL, PERFORMING, AND APPLIED ARTS – 1 Credit – Proficiency in State Content Standards for Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts (1 credit).

    • WORLD LANGUAGE – 2 Credits (Effective with students entering 3rd Grade in 2006) – Formal coursework or an equivalent learning experience in Grades K-12 (2 credits); or – Formal coursework or an equivalent learning experience in Grades K-12 (1 credit) and completion of a Department approved formal CTE program; or an additional visual, performing, and applied arts credit (1 credit).

Michigan Merit Curriculum • The Michigan Merit Curriculum (MMC) is not a curriculum in the traditional sense - it is legislation that specifies all students awarded a diploma have demonstrated proficiency with the content outlined by the state academic standards, benchmarks or guidelines. Challenging Courses = Big Rewards. Students who take strong academic courses in high school are more likely to succeed in college and earn a degree. That's important, because higher education pays: On average, college graduates earn more than a million dollars more over a lifetime than those with only a high school education.

  • What Employers and Training Programs Want. Employers, apprenticeship programs and the military all agree - they expect you to arrive with essential skills, including speaking and writing clearly, analyzing information, conducting research, and solving complex problems all while expecting you to identify the most useful connections to accomplish the task at hand.

  • Preparation for College Success. It's not just about getting in - it's about finishing. To best prepare for success in college-level work, students need to complete the Michigan Merit Curriculum in high school.

The Michigan Merit Curriculum reimagines what the diploma represents. With credit based on student proficiency instead of seat time, the diploma represents what the students knows and can do, not the courses that they took. Credits don’t have to equate courses; instead courses, CTE programs, work internships, and other learning opportunities can provide pieces of a variety of credits – filling up the credit pipeline. • The legislation also allows for specific credit requirements and/or content standards to be modified based on the individual learning needs of a student. It is designed to serve students who want to accelerate or go beyond the MMC requirements as well as students who need to individualize learning requirements to meet the MMC requirement.